Atlantic City and Shore Railroad Company
Coaches: Nos. 101-117
Combines: Nos. 118-119

HO Scale

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Kit AC&SRR-101 Kit AC&SRR-115
 
THE COMPANY
In 1906, the West Jersey and Seashore Railroad announced plans to electrify its main line, the Stern and Silverman Syndicate, under a railroad charter and formed the Atlantic City and Shore Railroad. The new company leased the Somers Point branch from the West Jersey and Seashore Railroad, which in turn double tracked the leased line and strung overhead trolley wire from its junction at Pleasantville to Somers Point. The West Jersey and Seashore Railroad was a 650 volt direct current third rail operation with overhead trolley wire, when required while traveling through populated areas. To complete the route into Atlantic City, the Shore Fast Line, as it was called, constructed a short private right-of-way from the West Jersey and Seashore Railroad in Atlantic City to Virginia and Adriatic avenues. At that point, the Fast Line acquired trackage rights over the Central Passenger Railway, a cross-town streetcar subsidiary of the West Jersey and Seashore Railroad, to run along Virginia Avenue to the Boardwalk. From Somers Point, it organized the Atlantic City and Ocean City Railroad, which had a streetcar charter to cross Great Egg Harbor Bay into Ocean City, Cape May County. Electricity was supplied from the new West Jersey and Seashore Railroad powerhouse at Westville, near Camden. The first regular car ran on August 25, 1906 with 15 minute head-ways from Atlantic City to Pleasantville and hourly trips to Somers Point. The demand for the new service was so great, the Syndicate's own Atlantic City and Suburban Traction Company was forced into bankruptcy. In 1908, The Atlantic City and Suburban Traction Company reorganized as the Atlantic and Suburban Railway, was merged into the Atlantic City and Shore Railroad but was operated independently until 1929 when it ceased operation. The Shore line also took control of the Atlantic Avenue Division and the Central Passenger Railway from the West Jersey and Seashore Railroad in 1908. In 1935, the interurban cars were rerouted southwest onto Atlantic Avenue and turned into Mississippi Avenue to join the West Jersey and Seashore line to Pleasantville. Inbound cars used Georgia Avenue, one block to the southwest. This middle-of-the-street freight trackage was originally used to haul heavy loads into the loading docks of Convention Hall, home of the Miss America Beauty Pageant. With this change, the old Central Passenger Railway and private right-of-way were abandoned. The Atlantic City and Shore Railroad, itself, was dissolved in 1945 by its sale to the Atlantic City Transportation Company. The new company operated the line until its end in 1948. The Atlantic Avenue Division continued operation until 1955.
ATLANTIC CITY AND SHORE RAILROAD COMPANY
The road extended from Atlantic City to Ocean City and Atlantic City to Longport, a distance of 24 miles. The Atlantic City and Ocean City Railroad Company and Atlantic Avenue Line operated under agreements with the West Jersey and Seashore Railroad, the former as a lease and the latter under trackage rights.
ATLANTIC CITY AND OCEAN CITY RAILROAD COMPANY
The road extended from Somers Point to 8th & Boardwalk in Ocean City, a distance of 2.61 miles. It was leased to the Atlantic City and Shore Railroad Company at an annual rental of $19,500 and a contingent rental based upon earnings. It was equipped and operated by the Atlantic City and Shore Railroad Company.
SHORE FAST LINE of 1907
The Shore Fast Line was a line of trolley cars running along the shore between Atlantic City and Ocean City from 1907 until 1948. It was operated by the Atlantic City and Shore Railroad
 
THE CARS
Twenty, splendid, wooden interurban cars were purchased from the Brill Company in Philadelphia and built in the John Stephenson factory in Elizabeth, NJ. These cars would serve the line well until its last day, January 18, 1948. A two-bay carhouse was built on the Atlantic City private right-of-way on Marmora Avenue between Illinois and New York avenues to house the classic passenger cars. All twenty cars were built to the same specifications: 47 feet in length, double ended and double trucked with railroad roofs. The coaches had thirteen windows and seated 52 passengers. In the 1940's, nine cars had green plush seats, five had leatherette seats and one car, #104, retained the original rattan seats. The combines had six windows with a baggage compartment. All cars were equipped with four General Electric 60 h.p. motors, multiple unit control and Brill 27E1-MCB trucks. Two-car trains were the limit of the MU capacity. The coaches were numbered 101-117, the combines 118 and 119. Combine #118 was rebuilt into a coach in 1924 and #119 became a tool shed at the Inlet Shops in 1946. At first the cars were painted red, in keeping with the Pennsylvania Railroad color scheme. Later, they were painted yellow and orange. Some of the cars went through several changes over the years with steel sheathing over the wooden sides, steel pilots and Tomlinson couplers. The twentieth car was originally built as the Absequam, a somber funeral car. This car went through several rebuildings and paint jobs both as a deluxe parlor car c1924 and as a coach in 1942. It was destroyed in a fire in 1944. Coaches 103, 107 and 116 were scrapped in 1940. The remaining cars were stored behind the carhouse after abandonment in January 1948 and were finally scrapped in late 1949.